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How to Create a Vendor Risk Management Strategy

Posted by Taylor Kennedy on October 17, 2017 in Public relations

INTRODUCTIONchecklist-1622517_1920

Crises can happen at any moment–take Chipotle for example. According to an analysis by a risk management company, if the restaurant chain had had a vendor risk management solution, the food may have never been contaminated.

It’s also important for hospitals and clinics to have a vendor risk management strategy in place. If a vendor were to make a mistake, it’s your hospital that unfortunately takes much of the blame and your patients who suffer the consequences. Here are tips on how to create such a strategy.

ALIGN THE PLAN WITH YOUR VALUES

When putting together the vendor risk management plan, make sure prospective vendors share the same values (e.g. customer-first mentality, trust, giving back, etc.) as your hospital. If they don’t and you hired them anyway, the public backlash could be fierce if an incident occurs.

It’s similar to hiring. When you interview job candidates, you want to make sure their values align with yours. Your CMO or CCO, whose job it is to build and protect your brand, should have input on the vendor risk management plan for this reason.

PROTECT YOUR BRAND

Create guidelines for your vendors to ensure a mutually successful business relationship and mitigate your risks. Areas of focus can include safety procedures, certifications, conflicts of interest and patient privacy. Also, in case of a crisis, make sure to have the contact information for the vendor’s representative, someone with high enough rank to be able to make decisions on a moment’s notice.

BE TRANSPARENT WITH YOUR PLAN

As stated above, make sure that your vendors share your same values. These values must be conveyed in the procurement process, including your vendor information page on your website, tradeshow displays and your RFPs. (Your communications team also should be demonstrating your values through marketing and PR efforts.) This makes it easier for your hospital to attract the right vendors in the first place.

Create an internal FAQ document on the vendor relationship policy and publish it on your hospital’s intranet site. This makes sure everyone on staff has access to it.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Revelation PR, Advertising & Social Media offers healthcare providers services related to media relations, crisis communications, internal communications, media buying, content marketing and social media management. Please contact Brian Lee, brian [at] experiencerevelation.com or 608-622-7767.

 

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How to Prevent Employee-Caused Data Breaches

Posted by Brian Lee on October 11, 2017 in Public relations

INTRODUCTION

cyber securitySecurity breaches in the healthcare industry are on pace for more than one per day, according to a recent report. What’s telling is that 9.2 percent of the breaches occurred through accidental email/internet exposure and 8.7 percent due to employee errors, an IT security company discovered.

It’s one thing to be targeted by hackers, but hospitals wanting to prevent healthcare data breaches need to eliminate ones caused by staff.

Here’s how you can protect patient health information:

EDUCATE AND TEST HOSPITAL STAFF

Your hospital’s PR and IT departments must focus internal communications efforts on education and situational training, respectively.

For the PR team, regular communications–be it newsletters, Intranet blog posts, presentations, quizzes and/or handouts–are important to engage staff and build a mindset in which security is at the forefront. You also need to make sure staff members achieve informed consent about safeguard processes (e.g. login authentication) that can be time-consuming or annoying, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

For the IT team, cybersecurity company Redspin says to test staff with phishing emails and phone calls. Supplement the training with posters, wikis and other items the staff can reference quickly.

With education and training, your hospital hopefully can avoid breaches such as the email scam that affected the nursing home chain American Senior Communities in Indiana.

MEASURE YOUR INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS EFFORTS

You want to make sure your education and training efforts are working. Per our tips on internal communications measurement, you’ll need to start by measuring outputs. For example, are staff members viewing, sharing or engaging with your content? If not, you’ll need to revise your tactics.

Next, you’ll need to measure your outcomes. For example, is your IT department seeing that employees are clicking on fewer and fewer phishing emails? Are quiz scores meeting a certain threshold? If not, you’ll need to figure out why and then alter your messages accordingly.

Ultimately, you’ll know you’re succeeding if you don’t have any breaches occur from the inside.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Revelation PR, Advertising & Social Media offers healthcare providers services related to media relations, crisis communications, internal communications, media buying, content marketing and social media management. Please contact Brian Lee, brian [at] experiencerevelation.com or 608-622-7767.

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Grading Cam Newton’s apology

Posted by Brian Lee on October 6, 2017 in Public relations

Situation: Carolina Panthers QB Cam Newton made a sexist remark to a female reporter during his press conference.

Grade for apology: C+

Analysis: The apology was not sincere enough, as evident in the line, “If you are a person who took offense to what I said, I sincerely apologize to you.” That implies the remark was not sexist to everyone, and he’s reluctantly apologizing.

In addition, Cam doesn’t explain how he’ll prevent saying these types of remarks in the future. He also misidentifies himself as the victim, stating “I’ve already lost sponsors and countless fans” (the actual victim is the reporter).

Here’s the full apology: “After careful thought, I understand that my word choice was extremely degrading, and disrespectful to women. To be honest, that was not my intention. If you are a person who took offense to what I said, I sincerely apologize to you. I’m a man who tries to be a positive role model in my community, and tries to use my platform to inspire others. I take ownership to everything that comes with that. And what I did was extremely unacceptable. I’m a father to two beautiful daughters, and at their age I try to instill in them that they can be anything that they want to be. The fact that during this whole process I’ve already lost sponsors and countless fans, I realize that the joke is really on me. I’ve learned a valuable lesson from this. And to the young people who see this, I hope you learn something from this as well. Don’t be like me, be better than me. To the reporters, the journalists, the moms, supermoms, to the daughters, the sisters, and the women all around the world, I sincerely apologize and hope that you can find the kindness in your heart to forgive me. Thank you.”

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