-

Seven Tips to Improve Your Healthcare IT Tradeshow Marketing

Posted by Taylor Kennedy on March 3, 2017 in Marketing

INTRODUCTION

Blue Tree NetworkHealthcare tradeshows provide a one-stop shop to keep up with industry trends, develop new contacts and drive new leads. According to CEIR, 81 percent of tradeshow display attendees have buying authority. With the right marketing strategy, tradeshows can provide your health tech company with increased brand awareness and direct sales opportunities.

Here are seven healthcare tradeshow tips to improve your marketing.

1. Have a plan
Planning for a tradeshow begins months prior to event. Set up a meeting with current staff, including marketing, sales and management, to ensure everyone agrees on the goals for attending the event. Make sure you address why your healthcare IT company or startup should attend, whom you need to meet, how will you gather leads and what specifically do you plan on doing at the show.

2. Be a part of the conversation
To expand your brand and message exposure, include the conference’s official hashtag (e.g. #health2con) with your social media posts. This is your chance to share your content, such as white papers and infographics, that are relevant to attendees. Also, check with the show organizers to see if there are opportunities to advertise your booth activities in an e-newsletter.

3. Execute media relations tactics
If the tradeshow doesn’t automatically send out an attendees list, research media outlets (e.g. HealthcareITNews) that will be attending and secure interviews for your subject matter experts and/or CEO. Have your PR team conduct media training so that the SMEs and CEO are prepared for interviews. Also, reporters don’t want to carry stacks of marketing collateral around the floor, so put your assets (including logo) on a USB stick or email them a link to your website’s media center.

4. Remember that the people in your booth matter
First impressions are lasting impressions. Create the right mix of staff who can answer every type of question. For instance, if you’re launching a new product at Health Informatics, include both sales and technical staff at your booth. Make sure staff members stay on message by using the pre-approved talking points with potential customers. Finally, don’t allow booth staff to sit idly–they need to appear welcoming and eager to engage with passers-by.

5. Select an ideal booth space
The better the booth location, the more traffic it will attract. Although companies don’t often have control over location, some tradeshows assign booth spaces based on exhibitor’s past participation and the booth size. If possible, distance yourself from your competitor’s exhibit and try to be near the action, such as a corner or intersection near the entrance.

6. Be unique
Not only is the location of your booth important, but what you display is, too. Simple pop-up banners don’t cut it anymore–you have to make your exhibit stand out among the sea of exhibits. For example, at HIMSS 2017, Bluetree Network’s space included a tall, blue tree, which was noticeable from all points in the tradeshow floor.

7. Follow-ups are key
Just because the tradeshow is over doesn’t mean the work stops. Do NOT add every business card you collected to an email marketing list, especially since opt-in is permission-based. Instead, send personal emails to everyone who stopped by, and set up follow-up meetings, webinars, calls, etc. to move prospects further along your sales funnel.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Revelation PR, Advertising & Social Media offers healthcare IT companies and startups services related to media relations, email marketing, investor relations, tradeshow marketing, content marketing and social media management. Please contact Brian Lee, brian [at] experiencerevelation.com or 608-622-7767.

Tags:

 
-

Joining the other side

Posted by Brian Lee on March 1, 2017 in Marketing, Public relations

LakersKobe Bryant’s agent, Rob Pelinka, will soon be joining the Los Angeles Lakers as the team’s general manager, according to reports. The media have been questioning whether Pelinka will be a good fit, seeing how he has no front office experience, and all of his contract negotiations have always been from the player’s side, not the team’s side.

To me, this situation parallels the public relations and marketing professions. For the former, it’s not uncommon for reporters to jump to PR, since they’ve worked with PR practitioners through media relations efforts. For the latter, media sales reps will hop over to marketing departments, since they’ve worked with marketers through media buys.

In both cases, I’m sure the people who have transitioned jobs would agree that they only saw one portion of the responsibilities their new job entails, and that there’s a bit to learn. For example, in their new marketing role, the media sales rep may have to learn how about brand management, market research and tradeshow marketing.

I think that Pelinka will succeed for the same reason why reporters and sales reps succeed: we’re in professions that rely more on experience than classroom learning (hence the reason why people can make these job transitions in the first place).

 

Tags:

 
-

Birthdays and business

Posted by Brian Lee on February 23, 2017 in Personal Note

birthday cakeToday is my birthday. When you get older, you care less about the gifts and more about the company, and that’s certainly true for me (although I do want that new Polaroid camera).

I realize that’s not too dissimilar from business. Of course clients and customers want results, as they should, but they also care about the company or consultants with whom they do business. That’s especially true with a commodity product or service.

So, thank you for coming to my birthday party, but no gifts are necessary.

Copyright © 2011-2017 Revelation PR, Advertising & Social Media Blog All rights reserved.
Desk Mess Mirrored Child v1.0 a child of the Desk Mess Mirrored v1.8.1 theme from BuyNowShop.com.